Do you have any thoughts on how to make faux fur piping? I’m working on a Mew Zakuro cosplay and she has detailing that looks like fur on the edges of her outfit & accessories. I’ve been able to find premade faux fur piping, but the less natural colors like light purple are proving difficult. I’m not sure if the usual method of making piping (like you would with cord & bias tape) would work since fur is so thick. Is my only option to dye white premade stuff to match?

Do you have any thoughts on how to make faux fur piping? I’m working on a Mew Zakuro cosplay and she has detailing that looks like fur on the edges of her outfit & accessories. I’ve been able to find premade faux fur piping, but the less natural colors like light purple are proving difficult. I’m not sure if the usual method of making piping (like you would with cord & bias tape) would work since fur is so thick. Is my only option to dye white premade stuff to match?

Hello there!

You can attempt to make your own faux fur piping, yes. Here’s my tips on that:

– Use a fur with a low pile. This will reduce the thickness and make it easier to sew, as well as creating a better effect with the proportions of the artwork.

– If you can’t find a suitably low-pile fur, you can trim down a longer faux fur. I would recommend using a method that wouldn’t create a perfectly even cut, such as a razorcomb, to make it look more natural. Wear a dust mask while trimming.

– You can also use a material that is fuzzy but isn’t a faux fur, such as a fleece or a fuzzy felt, if the faux fur proves too difficult.

– You may need to sew a strip of faux fur with strips of a non-pile fabric. Laid flat, this would be a strip of regular fabric, a strip of fur, and then another strip of regular fabric that matches your garment. When folded in half to match up the two regular fabric pieces, you’ll have a place to sew where the piping can be inserted but that will reduce bulk, while the fur would stick up past the edge of the garment and be visible.

– If you don’t do the extra work of sewing the strips, trim down the far on the seam allowance once it is sewn to reduce bulk.

– Depending on the bulk of your fur and the look you want, you may need to reduce the size of the cording you use on the inside, or even skip it altogether.

If you decide to go the route of dyeing, always test the dye, since the materials they use for faux fur are notoriously hard to dye, even with dyes meant for synthetics. I’ve personally had better luck with regular RIT dye than synthetic-specific dyes on faux fur, but it depends on the fur itself. Try not to use too high of heat, and if you do, comb out the fur with the heat from a hairdryer after to get it back into shape. You can also look into use alcohol ink for dyeing.

I hope that helps! Good luck! :]

Fabrickind / Q&A Staff / Twitter

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I want to do the Dalish warrior armor from Dragon Age: Inquisition, but I don’t know how to make a pattern for foam pieces (such as the pauldrons) do you know how I could make them?

I want to do the Dalish warrior armor from Dragon Age: Inquisition, but I don’t know how to make a pattern for foam pieces (such as the pauldrons) do you know how I could make them?

Hello there!

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For armor made of foam, I find it easiest to make patterns and mockups out of cheap materials that act in similar ways – in this case, a thin cardboard would be a good option. It’s a bit stiffer than foam, but you can harvest it from cereal boxes for free and it’s close enough. Once you get the hang of it, make a mockup in cheap, thin EVA foam (like the craft foam sheets from a craft store) for a closer material match, and then move to a nicer foam for your finished product (or just stick with the cheap stuff! It works, but might need reinforcing).

For pauldrons, my biggest tip I can give you is to mind your curves. You know how you need to have seams in order to get a piece of fabric to create a curve? This is the same principle, only in foam. Something like this is going to be like sewing two curvier parts of a princess seam together. The seam at the parts you want to be rounder (like near the shoulder) will have a more pronounced curve, and at the parts you want less round (like near the arm) will have a less pronounced curve. 

Experiment with creating curved seams in paper first, and then move your way up to nicer materials. Be sure to get the curve correct before you do any detailing or other shaping so that you can make sure that the detailing won’t change position too much if you need to change the curve. Any detailing that might need to cross any seams you have should also obviously be patterned after the seam curve is correct.

You can apply this principle to all sorts of shapes – need something with a more complex shape? Add more seams!

Once everything is shaped with seams, I would still recommend heating the foam with a heat gun so it can retain the curve easier and be easier to glue the pieces together.

Good luck! I hope that helps :]

Fabrickind / Q&A Staff / Twitter

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@driiift Submitted:do you have any idea how to fix broken wig clips? i’m going to buy a broken wig…

@driiift Submitted:do you have any idea how to fix broken wig clips? i’m going to buy a broken wig…

@driiift Submitted:

do you have any idea how to fix broken wig clips? i’m going to buy a broken wig from a friend with the intent of fixing it and then using it.

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here are what the broken clips look like and the clips on both pigtails are broken in the same way.

Hello there!

This is thankfully a fairly easy fix! Ponytails are attached to the clips with an elastic drawstring. You should see the ends of the drawstring at one end of the clip.

Simply loosen the drawstring, remove the broken clip, replace it with one of the same size, and then tighten the drawstring around the new clip. I would keep one of the clips intact while you do the other one so you can more easily see how it goes together/about where the claw pieces are poked through the netting.

I hope that helps! Good luck :]

Fabrickind / Q&A Staff / Twitter

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andsewingishalfthebattle: The Flaming Bentley Now that it has…

andsewingishalfthebattle:
The Flaming Bentley
Now that it has…

andsewingishalfthebattle:

The Flaming Bentley

Now that it has made its debut at Gen Con, I can post pictures of the flaming Good Omens Bentley I built for the costume contest!

It’s around nine feet long, modular (it has to break down for transport), driveable (in straight lines, at least – steering is a bit of challenge!), and even has a wireless speaker inside to blare Queen tunes at top volume.

The majority of the materials were recycled or scavenged; the frame was built using a wheelchair, several walkers, old shelves, scrap lumber, various kinds of pipe, hula hoops, even some vinyl siding left over from work done on my house. The SFX are classic fake-torch technique, with nine LED-backed PC cooling fans (connected to four 6V batteries, mounted beneath the hood) blowing on fabric “flames.” The side panel is illuminated with one hundred twinkle LEDs mounted on holographic vinyl. Construction took around two weeks (though for the second half of that I was pretty much working on the car full-time).

I have a lot of photos and videos that I still need to sort through, including an extended video of the car driving around Gen Con and through Indianapolis on the way back to the parking garage after the contest (because where else are you going to park a nine-foot-long car prop?). I’ll try to post some clips from that later.

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Hi! I’m planning on cosplaying Anastasia’s opera dress from the musical (the really long pretty blue one) to BroadwayCon and I’m wondering how exactly to do the sequin detailing on the skirt of the dress. On the top, I can probably get away with sequin string or tape, but on the skirt, I’m not sure what to do, especially with the chiffon side panels that the stage version has. I’m going to be adding the details onto a plain blue dress. Any advice would be super helpful. Thank you very much!

Hi! I’m planning on cosplaying Anastasia’s opera dress from the musical (the really long pretty blue one) to BroadwayCon and I’m wondering how exactly to do the sequin detailing on the skirt of the dress. On the top, I can probably get away with sequin string or tape, but on the skirt, I’m not sure what to do, especially with the chiffon side panels that the stage version has. I’m going to be adding the details onto a plain blue dress. Any advice would be super helpful. Thank you very much!

Hello there!

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Looking at images of this, there’s a couple of ways to go about it: the more expensive way and the “oh god, why” time-intensive way.

The dress appears to be made of a sequin fabric. This is why doing the sequin tape doesn’t seem feasible on the skirt – that pattern of sequins was likely already built into the fabric. If it wasn’t, it was custom applied in that pattern. The more expensive way to do things would be this: buy a base dress, and then use a sequin lace as an overlay. You probably won’t be able to get an exact match in materials, but you can likely come close, especially if you use a plainer sequin fabric for the upper portions and then splice a patterned fabric to the bottom of the skirt. 

The second option would be to create the pattern yourself, or something that approximates it. You probably won’t want to apply individual sequins, but you can cut up sequin fabric (hint: the popularity of a certain animated film makes finding blue allover sequin fabric VERY easy these days) and applique the pieces individually. This would get your closer in accuracy, but it would take a LONG time.

Personally, I’d go with method 1, but it’s up to you.

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Based on this image, the cris-cross pattern continues all the way around the skirt, not just in the center, so that really makes it appear to be a full sequin fabric. It won’t be exact in most cases, but you can easily find blue sequin lace fabric with a grid pattern, so all you would need to do is turn that diagonally and then splice another material to the bottom, using the shape of the pattern to hide the seam (the shape of the seam would follow the pattern).

For the chiffon side bits, these appear to just be an overlay sewn onto the sides of the dress. You can see where they would attach – the bottom row of rhinestone trim on the sides hides the seam. I’m not sure if the overlay continues to the backside, but from the way they sit, I would say that they are either full or half circles, which is how you get all those lovely wavy bits at the bottom.

I hope that helps! Good luck :]

Fabrickind / Q&A Staff / Twitter

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