fontscosplay: It’s zero hour: The con starts in less than a day,…

fontscosplay:
It’s zero hour: The con starts in less than a day,…

fontscosplay:

It’s zero hour: The con starts in less than a day, and your cosplay still has so much work left…

This mix is for those times when you need to buckle down and get it done – energizing, upbeat tracks to keep you motivated. A little silly sometimes, too, to keep your spirits up.

A mix of genres, from pop-punk to 90’s dance to alt rock, and a few other detours along the way.


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andsewingishalfthebattle: vivaciousvernacular: I’m sure the…

andsewingishalfthebattle:
vivaciousvernacular:

I’m sure the…

andsewingishalfthebattle:

vivaciousvernacular:

I’m sure the costume department would be thrilled if they could just plant some seeds and grow costumes without actually having to sew anything, but I’m reasonably certain the word you want here is sewn.

Sow: To plant seeds, often by scattering them.

Sew: To join together by stitching, e.g. with needle and thread.

Me, planting costume seeds:

Reminder to water your costume seeds

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Hello! I’ve been thinking about cosplay as Nico from DMC5 and was wondering if you could help me with her vest and toolbelt? Please and thank you

Hello! I’ve been thinking about cosplay as Nico from DMC5 and was wondering if you could help me with her vest and toolbelt? Please and thank you

Hello there!

image

For her vest, I would recommend basing it off of a pattern for a button-down shirt with a collar. You would be able to crop the pattern to the correct length and simply leave off any sleeves included in the pattern. The buttons can be replaced with snaps – look for some with pearlized backs to them for the same effect as her vest. You will likely need a pair of eyelet/snap pliers in order to apply these, and may need to cut tiny holes in the p/leather for the prongs to go through before crimping.

You can use either a real leather or a faux leather for this project, depending on what you have access to and are comfortable working with. Be sure the material is soft and pliable enough to drape around your body, but not so thin that it doesn’t have the same effect as the render – it needs to plausibly look like a jacket material. Either way, be sure to stock up on some leather needles for your sewing machine to ensure the material can be punched through, and if possible, get a teflon/nonstick foot for your machine so you can do all the required topstitching without the material sticking to the foot. Note that with both of these materials, any holes or marks you make will not self heal with with regular fabrics, meaning that the holes will be permanent. Be sure to make a mockup or two and then mark your stitching lines on the actual material with something easy to remove (such as tailor’s chalk – test anything you use on a scrap first).

I would also recommend creating a bit of weathering on your material in order to get the worn-in look her jacket has. On real leather, this can be done with dye that is lightly dabbed on with a large-hole sponge or a balled-up rag. Be sure to not saturate the sponge very much! On pleather, you can use similar techniques but with paint. Use a brownish yellow base material and then use a reddish brown and a greyish brown in layers (once the previous layer dries) in order to get a similar effect to her vest. You can also add a bit of dye or paint dry brushed into the seams and along areas of wear once the vest is sewn to add a bit more depth.

For her tool pouch,I would look at how actual tool pouches are constructed. Here is a good example. They are generally a rectangle of leather with pockets sewn on the inside and then folded up at the bottom and sewn to create a larger bottom pocket. Experiment with some paper models or pieces of fabric to make sure you have the correct proportions and fully grasp the concept – I have a feeling that once you get it in your hands, it’ll be easier to understand how one goes together. You can then simply sew loops to the top that the belt would thread through.

I hope that helps! Good luck :]

Fabrickind / Q&A Staff / Twitter

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What kind of fabric do you suggest yo make a dress shirt? Specifically as an undershirt to a lolita style outfit. Everywhere I look says “cotton,” but that’s extremely unhelpful because that’s half the fabric store. Any specifics in terms of brand or description I should keep an eye out for?

What kind of fabric do you suggest yo make a dress shirt? Specifically as an undershirt to a lolita style outfit. Everywhere I look says “cotton,” but that’s extremely unhelpful because that’s half the fabric store. Any specifics in terms of brand or description I should keep an eye out for?

Hello there!

image

This question touches on one of my biggest pet peeves, and it is such a huge pet peeve because it makes finding information incredibly difficult for people like you – when people conflate fabric type with fiber type. So first, a short lesson in fabrics, so that you know why people’s recommendations on this are not very good.

When talking about fabrics, there are two main properties that are discussed. One is what the fabric was made out of, and the other is how the fabric was made. The former is referred to as the fiber, and the latter is referred to as the finish, the fabric type, the weave (if it’s a woven fabric), etc. “Cotton,” in this case, is the fiber, but it tells you nothing about what was done to that fiber in order to turn it into a fabric – this would be akin to someone telling you “plastic,” but not specifying if that plastic had been made into a spoon or into a bottle. (Similarly, a spoon – analogous to the finish here – can be made out of many different material types, just like how a particular fabric weave can be made out of multiple fiber types.)

Now, for the answer: cotton is a good fiber to look for when making a lolita-style blouse, so that half of the recommendation is good. Other weaves are also used (chiffon being one of the more popular ones), but for a basic blouse, you are mostly going to be looking at cottons and cotton blends.

When people refer to just plain “cotton,” they are typically talking about a flat weave sheeting. This would be the type of fabric you would find in varying weights and colors in the quilting section of the fabric store, and would be a decent option if you found one with the correct weight for a blouse. I would stay away from the cheapest options and anything that looks too coarse, and instead look for something that has a smooth finish and is medium weight.

I have, in my lolita fashion days, used heavier cotton muslins to great effect, as well. I would recommend that if you are looking to make a white or off-white “natural” blouse.

Cotton or cotton blend sateen would also be a good option if you want something with a little bit more sheen to it, but keeping the same texture. It would be good for a slightly more formal blouse, especially in gothic or classic style. You may find this in the quilting section or in the sportswear section, depending on the fabric store and the weight of the fabric. Sateen is basically the same weave as satin, but it is made from spun fibers (like cotton) rather than extruded fibers (like polyester or silk) so that it has less of a shine to it, fyi.

Another good option would be a cotton poplin, which is often used for dress shirts and has a slightly corded texture to it. If you don’t mind the blouse being slightly sheer, a cotton batiste would also be an option.

Most of these fabrics also come in stretch varieties, which aren’t going to be as stretchy as a knit, but have a bit of spandex fiber mixed in to allow the material a bit of give. This helps with comfort when wearing, so don’t be afraid of these. You may also come across cotton/polyester blends, which are good when you want the fabric to resist wrinkles but still have the overall look and feel of a 100% cotton material. 

When you’re in a fabric store, an employee would be able to point you towards any of these materials if you end up not being able to find them yourself. I would recommend touching all of the fabrics and draping them over your hand to make sure it’s what you want before buying.

I hope that helps! Good luck. :]

Fabrickind / Q&A Staff / Twitter

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