Hello! Im going to be cosplaying The Final Pamfrim in a couple months and she’s a character with a lot of rough skin and scars. Can you point me in the direction of any costume makeup tips or tutorials I can use to try and replicate those effects?? (This blog is so helpful, i love it) Thank you!!

Hello! Im going to be cosplaying The Final Pamfrim in a couple months and she’s a character with a lot of rough skin and scars. Can you point me in the direction of any costume makeup tips or tutorials I can use to try and replicate those effects?? (This blog is so helpful, i love it) Thank you!!

 

Hello there!

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We have a bunch of scar tutorials over here. For this character, I would recommend a combination of colored makeup and rigid collodion. This is a product that is brushed onto skin and as it dries, it shrinks in a way that, when combined with makeup, creates realistic-looking ‘rough skin’ type scars. It takes a little practice, but is relatively beginner-friendly, and would be great for the scars on her cheeks. If you want a more intense peeling skin look, liquid latex is a good option.

I hope that helps! Good luck :]

Fabrickind / Q&A Staff

 

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Hey there! I was wondering if you could give me a few tips on creating a cosplay with lots of details? I am trying to cosplay Mei from overwatch but the designs on her outfit seem a little daunting. Her props are also very large and detailed. Any recommendations?

Hey there! I was wondering if you could give me a few tips on creating a cosplay with lots of details?

I am trying to cosplay Mei from overwatch but the designs on her outfit seem a little daunting. Her props are also very large and detailed. Any recommendations?

 

Hello there!

For a cosplay with lots of small details, I find that what helps most it to really break it down into its component parts before starting.You can do this in several ways, or combine ways.

One way is to draw everything out. Make a quick sketch of the character and outfit and make sure that you copy every single detail over from the art. This way, you are forced to think about what each item is and where it belongs. This can be especially useful in some outfits where things like attachment points are ambiguous, or where there might be partially-hidden details.

Another way to go about this is to label a reference image. I like to print out images and do this by hand, though you can do it digitally as well. Draw an arrow to each piece and label what it is, what the color is, and what material you think it is. If you have ideas on how to make the items, you can write that down, as well.

You can also make a list of all the items, which is helpful once you’ve broken it all down visually. Some people also make collages of different reference images so that they can see the items from different angles. It might also be helpful to compile tutorial or purchase links in with your collages or lists, if that seems useful.

As for actually tackling the details, do it one part at a time. Give yourself plenty of time to work on the costume, and take it slowly if you have to. It helps to see things not as a daunting whole, but as small parts – for example, not a large and complex garment, but a set of sleeves, and a torso, and some embroidery on the sleeves, and this trim sewn to the neck, and that trim sewn to the center front, etc.– so that you know that you can tackle the costume one piece at a time. I find that making detailed to-do lists helps with this, and the more I break down the steps, the more it helps (and the more satisfying it is when I work on the costume for an hour and can check off 3 things from the list!). Don’t think of it as “I need to make Mei’s prop,” but instead take it slowly and think “I need to make this one specific part of Mei’s prop.” It may seem daunting to look at that long list of things to do, but even then, you can break it down further and only make a list for the prop, or only for the top, etc., as you go. 

It also helps to take a break, even if it’s just taking a break from one part to work on another part. Sewing can happen while paint is drying, for example. Looking at things with fresh eyes can also help if you start to become frustrated with a piece.

I hope that helps! Good luck :]

Fabrickind / Q&A Staff

 

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Do you have a tutorial on how to change the color of leather shoes?

Do you have a tutorial on how to change the color of leather shoes?

 

Hello there!

We have several tutorials on painting shoes over here. A lot of people swear by Angelus brand leather paints for shoes, so I would look into that brand.

I hope that helps! Good luck :]

Fabrickind / Q&A Staff

 

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Hi I was hoping to cosplay Link in his Sheikah Armor Set from Breath of the Wild, and I was wondering how to go about making his bodysuit. I’m not quite sure what materials/fabrics would work best. Would the top be more like a breast plate or would it be more stretchy/fitted to the body? How would one go about making something more like a bodysuit? (if that’s the case) Sorry for so many questions and thank you for your help! :D

Hi I was hoping to cosplay Link in his Sheikah Armor Set from Breath of the Wild, and I was wondering how to go about making his bodysuit. I’m not quite sure what materials/fabrics would work best. Would the top be more like a breast plate or would it be more stretchy/fitted to the body? How would one go about making something more like a bodysuit? (if that’s the case) Sorry for so many questions and thank you for your help! 😀

 

Hello there!

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I read this as a bodysuit, not a chestplate, but I also haven’t seen the model in action.

For bodysuits, I would recommend using a pattern, especially if this is your first time making one. Several commercial patterns are available, and we have some tutorials over here.

As for fabrics, you want a fabric with two things: good stretch (4-watch stretch over 50~70% in each direction) and good recovery. Stretch is how far the fabric can be pulled apart without straining, and recovery is how easily it snaps back into shape after you let go. Without both, you’ll end up with an ill-fitted, saggy suit. Here’s some tips on sewing with stretch fabrics.

For this, I would recommend a matte milliskin. This is a stretch material that is very matte in texture and a bit thicker than a ‘regular’ spandex, so it’ll create a slightly heavier look than a thinner material.

I hope that helps! Good luck :]

Fabrickind / Q&A Staff

 

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