Hello! I want to say this blog is a god send for my friends and I. I wanted to ask if you know how to go about the attire that Ardyn Izunia (or Ardyn Lucis Caelum)wears. It looks like a fun cosplay I wanted to try and make it. What tips do you have for the vest, undershirt and the little gray thing that has a whole heck of holes on his shoulders. Thank you!!

Hello! I want to say this blog is a god send for my friends and I. I wanted to ask if you know how to go about the attire that Ardyn Izunia (or Ardyn Lucis Caelum)wears. It looks like a fun cosplay I wanted to try and make it. What tips do you have for the vest, undershirt and the little gray thing that has a whole heck of holes on his shoulders. Thank you!!

 

Hello there!

image

I’ll split this one up into the different parts.

For the vest, the best advice I can give is to get a vest pattern and do whatever modifications you need from there. A garment like a vest is hard to draft from scratch or modify from another garment if you don’t have a lot of tailoring experience. I would recommend making a template for his appliques digitally, if you can, and then printing them out and cutting them, to ensure that they are even. You can also draw a template by hand with a ruler.

It appears that the order of sewing on the applique is: base fabric -> dark brown center -> light grey exterior. If you can get a fabric that doesn’t fray for the light grey, your life will be easier, since you won’t have to finish the edges.

A slight note – I noticed in one of the references I looked at that his vest buttons the opposite way than men’s vests usually do. I don’t know if that is consistent across refs (or if this one was mirrored), but it’s a tiny detail I thought was worth mentioning.

For the undershirt, the pattern seems simple enough, though you will likely need to hide a closure in it, such as an invisible zipper. I would HIGHLY recommend finding a fabric that comes pre-pleated so that you don’t have to do all that work yourself! Most pleated fabrics are synthetics, since the plastic can hold the fold easier than a natural fiber, and you won’t have to worry about maintaining the pleats by hand. I would recommend using a stiffer fabric or a sew-in interfacing in the collar, and then sewing the plated fabric to the outside for looks. This will keep the fabric stiff and upright, while still giving you the pleated look.

For the grey parts, you want a fabric that isn’t going to fray, first and foremost. A synthetic fabric can be cut with a heat knife to seal the edges, but what I would recommend is a high-quality felt. The edges won’t need to be sealed because it doesn’t fray, and you can get the same texture that his outfit has. (Bonus: you can use the same felt for the light grey vest applique!) A faux suede, as long as it doesn’t fray, would also be a good choice, as the texture seems to change between reference images.

The holes appear to have stitching around them, so here’s how I would go about this:

Make a template on tissue paper of where the holes need to go. Overlay this on your fabric, so you know where the holes need to be. (You can also trace it on with an erasable fabric marker.) Sew around the lines that you marked for the holes. Remove the tissue or the marker, and using a pair of sharp embroidery scissors, cut about 1/8″ from the stitch line, following the stitches, on the insides of the holes. Remove the fabric you just cut and repeat for the rest.

If your fabric isn’t stiff enough on its own to hold the shape you need, sandwich a piece of lightweight sew-in interfacing or some other kind of non-fraying, stable material between two pieces of your chosen fabric before sewing around the holes. Cut through all three layers at once. This will give the look of the same material on front and back, but give it a little more body.

Overall, this costume seems to be all about varying realistic textures to create a cohesive, but visually appealing, overall effect, so be sure to keep texture in mind when choosing your materials.

I hope that helps! Good luck :]

Fabrickind / Q&A Staff / Twitter

  1. Get The Details…

andsewingishalfthebattle: Bentley skeleton pics I’ve had several…

andsewingishalfthebattle:
Bentley skeleton pics
I’ve had several…

andsewingishalfthebattle:

Bentley skeleton pics

I’ve had several people ask me how the Bentley is constructed, so here are some progress photos that show the frame.

The first picture is what I started with. Two weeks before Gen Con, I had one wheelchair and two walkers (I scavenged the wheels off the second walker to make four rolling feet on what was originally going to be the front end). A couple of days later, I found two more walkers at a rummage sale, which saved me from having to fabricate a lot more frame pieces.

The second picture was maybe a third of the way into the build. Only about half the pieces are there, but you can see the basic car shape starting to come together. I cut boards to fit across the walkers and wheelchair frame to support the electrical and linking structural elements. To reduce weight, most of the non-structural elements are made of lighter wood, hollow plastic tubes, aluminum strips, or foam board.

The third picture was a few days later (six days before the con), after I’d built the axles, running boards, hood supports, electrical system frames, roof, front grill, and fender mounts. I hadn’t added the side struts or bumper yet; those didn’t get added until the night before the con started, because WHO NEEDS SLEEP ANYWAY.

The fourth pic is the first time I tested the side wall with the LEDs installed. I also had the front set of fan flames hooked up by that point.

And the last photo is the whole thing completely assembled for the very first time! Of course, I then had to immediately turn around and disassemble it so I could get it out of my house, because it was too wide to fit through the front door. But hey, that’s why I made the whole thing modular. 🙂

Get The Details…

Do you have any thoughts on how to make faux fur piping? I’m working on a Mew Zakuro cosplay and she has detailing that looks like fur on the edges of her outfit & accessories. I’ve been able to find premade faux fur piping, but the less natural colors like light purple are proving difficult. I’m not sure if the usual method of making piping (like you would with cord & bias tape) would work since fur is so thick. Is my only option to dye white premade stuff to match?

Do you have any thoughts on how to make faux fur piping? I’m working on a Mew Zakuro cosplay and she has detailing that looks like fur on the edges of her outfit & accessories. I’ve been able to find premade faux fur piping, but the less natural colors like light purple are proving difficult. I’m not sure if the usual method of making piping (like you would with cord & bias tape) would work since fur is so thick. Is my only option to dye white premade stuff to match?

Hello there!

You can attempt to make your own faux fur piping, yes. Here’s my tips on that:

– Use a fur with a low pile. This will reduce the thickness and make it easier to sew, as well as creating a better effect with the proportions of the artwork.

– If you can’t find a suitably low-pile fur, you can trim down a longer faux fur. I would recommend using a method that wouldn’t create a perfectly even cut, such as a razorcomb, to make it look more natural. Wear a dust mask while trimming.

– You can also use a material that is fuzzy but isn’t a faux fur, such as a fleece or a fuzzy felt, if the faux fur proves too difficult.

– You may need to sew a strip of faux fur with strips of a non-pile fabric. Laid flat, this would be a strip of regular fabric, a strip of fur, and then another strip of regular fabric that matches your garment. When folded in half to match up the two regular fabric pieces, you’ll have a place to sew where the piping can be inserted but that will reduce bulk, while the fur would stick up past the edge of the garment and be visible.

– If you don’t do the extra work of sewing the strips, trim down the far on the seam allowance once it is sewn to reduce bulk.

– Depending on the bulk of your fur and the look you want, you may need to reduce the size of the cording you use on the inside, or even skip it altogether.

If you decide to go the route of dyeing, always test the dye, since the materials they use for faux fur are notoriously hard to dye, even with dyes meant for synthetics. I’ve personally had better luck with regular RIT dye than synthetic-specific dyes on faux fur, but it depends on the fur itself. Try not to use too high of heat, and if you do, comb out the fur with the heat from a hairdryer after to get it back into shape. You can also look into use alcohol ink for dyeing.

I hope that helps! Good luck! :]

Fabrickind / Q&A Staff / Twitter

Get The Details…

I want to do the Dalish warrior armor from Dragon Age: Inquisition, but I don’t know how to make a pattern for foam pieces (such as the pauldrons) do you know how I could make them?

I want to do the Dalish warrior armor from Dragon Age: Inquisition, but I don’t know how to make a pattern for foam pieces (such as the pauldrons) do you know how I could make them?

Hello there!

image
image

For armor made of foam, I find it easiest to make patterns and mockups out of cheap materials that act in similar ways – in this case, a thin cardboard would be a good option. It’s a bit stiffer than foam, but you can harvest it from cereal boxes for free and it’s close enough. Once you get the hang of it, make a mockup in cheap, thin EVA foam (like the craft foam sheets from a craft store) for a closer material match, and then move to a nicer foam for your finished product (or just stick with the cheap stuff! It works, but might need reinforcing).

For pauldrons, my biggest tip I can give you is to mind your curves. You know how you need to have seams in order to get a piece of fabric to create a curve? This is the same principle, only in foam. Something like this is going to be like sewing two curvier parts of a princess seam together. The seam at the parts you want to be rounder (like near the shoulder) will have a more pronounced curve, and at the parts you want less round (like near the arm) will have a less pronounced curve. 

Experiment with creating curved seams in paper first, and then move your way up to nicer materials. Be sure to get the curve correct before you do any detailing or other shaping so that you can make sure that the detailing won’t change position too much if you need to change the curve. Any detailing that might need to cross any seams you have should also obviously be patterned after the seam curve is correct.

You can apply this principle to all sorts of shapes – need something with a more complex shape? Add more seams!

Once everything is shaped with seams, I would still recommend heating the foam with a heat gun so it can retain the curve easier and be easier to glue the pieces together.

Good luck! I hope that helps :]

Fabrickind / Q&A Staff / Twitter

Get The Details…

@driiift Submitted:do you have any idea how to fix broken wig clips? i’m going to buy a broken wig…

@driiift Submitted:do you have any idea how to fix broken wig clips? i’m going to buy a broken wig…

@driiift Submitted:

do you have any idea how to fix broken wig clips? i’m going to buy a broken wig from a friend with the intent of fixing it and then using it.

image
image

here are what the broken clips look like and the clips on both pigtails are broken in the same way.

Hello there!

This is thankfully a fairly easy fix! Ponytails are attached to the clips with an elastic drawstring. You should see the ends of the drawstring at one end of the clip.

Simply loosen the drawstring, remove the broken clip, replace it with one of the same size, and then tighten the drawstring around the new clip. I would keep one of the clips intact while you do the other one so you can more easily see how it goes together/about where the claw pieces are poked through the netting.

I hope that helps! Good luck :]

Fabrickind / Q&A Staff / Twitter

Get The Details…